Project WarBike Finds One In Four Hotspots Lack Good Security

By Robert Vamosi | 9/11/12 2:41 AM

More than ten years after war driving became a household term, Sophos has reinvented the term ... and unfortunately would that random, wireless networks are still vulnerable today.

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Geo-Location Inside Buildings Using FM Signals

By Robert Vamosi | 6/29/12 4:12 AM

Researchers have found a way to create more accurate geo-location services inside buildings.

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Almost All Android Phones Leak Account Details

By Robert Vamosi | 5/17/11 5:54 AM

Android researchers have found a way to capture Google's ClientLogin authentication protocol on open WiFi networks and then use it to impersonate others on all of Google's services, not just Calendar and Contacts.

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Wi-Fi Users Beware: Firesheep on the Loose in Your Gmail, Facebook, and Other Online Accounts

By JDavis | 2/23/11 7:36 AM

Firesheep, the latest threat to Wi-Fi users, is free, open source, and easy for even the intermediate user to figure out. In fact, over the past three months, more than 1 million individuals have downloaded Firesheep and have the ability to see what other Wi-Fi users on an unsecured network are doing.

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Electric Cars and their Freedom to Roam

By JDavis | 2/22/11 8:04 AM

With more generations of electric cars coming, will they be subject to the same “roaming” that is found between cell phone providers? In a joint venture between Europe networking service providers, the development of e-roaming for the electric vehicle industry is forthcoming. This past week, Nokia Siemens Networks announced the development of a new authentication service, which will enable electric vehicle drivers to “roam,” at the Mobile World Congress.

E-Clearing.net is the brand-new service that will use your information (e.g., your charging contract ID or PIN number) to authorize charging among various electric car networks, simplifying customer billing much like how it is done with wireless phone service now.

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iPhone Hackers Can Gain Access to Your Passwords in 6 Minutes or Less

By JDavis | 2/18/11 8:08 AM

German researchers recently discovered how easy it is for someone to jailbreak your iPhone and reveal your passwords in six minutes. This type of hack doesn’t require the use of the phone’s passcode, mainly because the cryptographic key on current iOS devices operates independently from it.

The attack works based on existing vulnerabilities on Apple’s iPhone that enable access to the operating file system. Many of the passwords available to the attacker range from Google or Microsoft Exchange email accounts to VPN and WiFi access and more.

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Printers: The New Hackers’ Instrument of Havoc?

By JDavis | 1/26/11 7:17 AM

According to recent research, there are many common office devices that are major hacking targets. In the past decade, printers have become more high-tech with Web, email, and WiFi capabilities, without the security to protect them from unwanted attacks. According to the Technology Review,

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LG Announces New Smart Grid-Connected Appliances

By JDavis | 1/10/11 3:14 AM

A new series of smart appliances just announced by LG will--in addition to having smart grid connectivity--communicate with each other over the network, as well as connect to owners' smartphones and tablet devices, giving them control over a wide range of energy-saving and diagnostic functions--bringing the kitchen to the forefront of the Internet of Things.

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A New Way to Weigh-in

By JDavis | 9/27/10 2:12 PM

In a recent product review, Wired.com profiles a new wi-fi enabled, web-connected scale that turns weight management into a cutting-edge, interactive smart device experience.

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Replacing Batteries With Radio Waves

By JDavis | 7/18/10 2:38 PM

A recent article in The New York Times looks at a number of new technologies that use ambient radio waves to provide power for wireless, low-power devices and sensors. Harnessing waves from everything in the air -- cellphone antennas, radio stations, TV towers, WiFi transmitters -- these new technologies are using otherwise wasted energy to power a wide range of low-power sensors.

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